@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

skullgiver

@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl

Giver of skulls

Verified icon

This profile is from a federated server and may be incomplete. Browse more on the original instance.

The anti-AI sentiment in the free software communities is concerning. (lemmy.world)

Whenever AI is mentioned lots of people in the Linux space immediately react negatively. Creators like TheLinuxExperiment on YouTube always feel the need to add a disclaimer that “some people think AI is problematic” or something along those lines if an AI topic is discussed. I get that AI has many problems but at the same...

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

I have yet to see any benefit to AI beyond the current browser UIs. The MS Paint image generation feature is neat for creating some quick clipart, if you mind the plagiarism, I guess.

Windows Recall shouldn’t be too hard to copy (it’s just OCR + CLIP on pediodic screenshots, after all) for those who want that sort of thing. Perhaps excluding private browser windows will be more of a challenge, especially on Wayland, but if the feature is built as an extension/plugin to the DE then I don’t think that’ll be impossible either.

Currently, the power and hardware requirements are too high for me to run anything useful locally, though. Even low-res image generation takes half a minute on my gaming GPU while burning a steady 180W of power.

The kind of text reformatting Apple has shown (selecting text and allowing a quick “make this paragraph more professional” in the context menu) takes forever on my hardware. Granted, it’s a few years old, but at 3 tokens per second I’m not exactly ready to install an AI addon yet.

I look forward to the Qualcomm and Apple advancements on this area, though. If the AI hype doesn’t die down, we may just see affordable and usable local AI in end user devices in a couple of years, and that’s pretty neat.

Hell, we may even see useful AI accelerator cards like that Coral thing or whatever it’s called, but with a usable amount of RAM. An upgradeable, replaceable AI accelerator could do a lot if AI stuff is going to be a hit in the future.

Like always, I expect Linux to be ahead of the curve when it comes to the technical ability (after all, Stable Diffusion ran on Linux long before Microsoft added it to Paint) but actually user friendly implementations will lag behind several years. Especially with the current direction of AI, basically advanced plagiarism and academic dishonesty machines, I don’t expect the free software community to embrace LLMs and other generative AI any time soon.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

ActivityPub doesn’t do DMs per se. Many ActivityPub implementations will use AP messages that are not posted on any public list or timeline. Basically, a Tweet with visibility set to “only people mentioned in this thread”.

This design makes it quite easy for AP servers to misimplement DMs. Asking a server for all messages of a particular user (to get their timeline) and forgetting to filter out messages not published globally is trivial to get wrong.

ActivityPub DMs are, in my opinion, not a good feature. This has come up before in Mastodon, where DMs mentioning a third account will add that account to the thread and destination of all future messages (and possibly authorise it for accessing past messages); one mention will give them full access to your “direct” messages.

I doubt this scraper did anything wrong here, I think it’s just a matter of a buggy server or users sending DMs that aren’t really DMs because of Fediverse software with GUI design flaws.

Edit: looks like it’s probably a Mastodon bug: hackers.town/

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

Yes, just like on twitter, reddit, and most of the other platforms the Fediverse is trying to replace, server admins are free to read your messages. There’s no encryption. The Fediverse just adds more server admins to the mix.

I would not recommend using the DM function on most Fediverse platforms for things you’d like to keep private. While in most cases there are no privacy risks, there are also very few guardrails to ensure that.

You’re better off using a federated platform with encryption support like Matrix or XMPP. Neither of those are very safe if you don’t verify the other’s keys (although neither is any other chat service, even Signal) but both are much safer.

If it weren’t for the lack of shared credentials, I would’ve expected someone to add a minimal secure chat client to the Lemmy frontend already. Especially on the servers that host a Matrix server already

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

That would imply stepping through a wall would immediately block all blood traveling anything but horizontal. You’d die before your head is halfway through…

Gnome extension on KDE?

I know the title sounds a little strange but hear me out. The time tracking software I use for work doesn’t work on Wayland, unless I’m using Gnome as my DE. They have an extension that allows it to work in this case. Personally, I don’t enjoy Gnome on my desktop (I use it on my laptop). Is there a way for me to get the...

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

Wayland doesn’t need to be a problem. The extension is running within Gnome, after all. Existing code will need to be rewritten, but extensions at this privilege level should be more than capable of doing what this program is doing.

In theory someone could write a GJS wrapper to get basic Gnome extensions to run on KDE but if there’s any kind of GUI modification/interaction involved, things will quickly break down.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

In theory, someone could write a tool that will run the extension’s code and translate it into KDE compatible code. I suspect this will be brittle as hell, and most GUI interaction features will probably be broken, but it could be done.

In practice, I don’t think such a wrapper exists. Either the application needs to be ported or you or someone else will need to set up such a wrapper hack.

What I’d recommend instead is looking for Gnome extensions to make Gnome feel more KDE like. Task bars and start menus can all be added to Gnome, and you can install all the KDE tools you like (Dolphin, Konqueror, you name it) without any extensions at all. Extensions like dash to panel may not match KDE exactly, but you can cobble together something functional much faster than porting this application tracking tool will ever be.

skullgiver, (edited )
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

[This comment has been deleted by an automated system]

skullgiver, (edited )
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

[This comment has been deleted by an automated system]

skullgiver, (edited )
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

[This comment has been deleted by an automated system]

Can Linux be dual booted on a computer with Windows?

I have a Lenovo Yoga running Windows 10 on a 1TB SSD and at some point will probably have to upgrade it to Windows 11. I use it for school and have to keep Windows on it for now because of what I’m currently doing. I want to start getting into Linux in hopes of making the switch sometime down the line. Is partitioning the disk...

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

When you (and everyone else here) say shrink the partition from inside windows, do you mean from within the disk management software?

Yes, indeed! The Linux installer will also offer to do this resizing, but the file system drivers in Linux are mostly painfully reverse engineered stuff, whereas Microsoft can actually write stable code. So it’s better to go to disk management and do the resizing there, so you don’t accidentally corrupt times

Nvidia stuff

Nvidia stuff can work fine, but you’ll have to read up on it after installing Linux. For almost all hardware, you install a distro and all drivers are installed. On Windows, drivers are installed during first boot. On Linux, proprietary drivers, like Nvidia’s, need to be installed manually. How this is done, depends on the distro.

Pop_OS will install these drivers quite easily during install time. Ubuntu has a button in their software settings (“additional hardware”) where you can click one single box and the driver should work after a reboot. On other distros, you’ll need to check the distro specific instructions on how to install drivers.

I would not recommend following Nvidia’s guides, which will have a very Windows style howto involving downloading an installer, something thst very rarely happens on Linux. I would also avoid guides/Ask Ubuntu answers that have you insert random lines into config files. Depending on the distro, some terminal work may be required, but many “fixes” seem to involve adding configuration files and settings that haven’t been relevant for years because everyone copy/pastes old advice, and that can cause issues down the line. Generally, I think it’s probably best to try to stick close do official distro manuals as possible.

One other thing: you may have encountered angry discussions about X11 and Wayland here. The details probably aren’t very important for you, but your best bet is probably to use X11. That’s not the default for many distros, but luckily switching back is easy (just click a drop down on the login screen and select X11). Wayland does work on your hardware, but Nvidia’s mediocre software isn’t very good at supporting modern protocols such as Wayland, so crashes and freezes are more common than you would expect/hope.

These days even Nvidia laptops work fine on many distros, something that was almost impossible ten years ago. There are some challenges (mostly involving power management and Wayland) but games work fine as far as Linux gaming is involved.

skullgiver, (edited )
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

[This comment has been deleted by an automated system]

skullgiver, (edited )
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

[This comment has been deleted by an automated system]

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

Apple already does a lot of this stuff. For example, it’ll do offline face recognition for your photos while your phone is charging overnight.

Plus, Apple is ahead of the curve when it comes to performance on this stuff. You don’t want to be running Stable Diffusion on your iPhone, but smaller AI is perfectly fine. Plus, unlike on Android, there are huge amounts of devices with ML accelerator chips that can run these models efficiently, allowing for power consumption optimisations by not having to provide a CPU fallback.

We’ll have to see how effective this will be in practice, but Apple generally doesn’t bring these types of features to their newer devices until they’re ready for daily use.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

PostgREST is pretty cool but I can never figure out a use case for it. You want something that’s not too cold, doesn’t interact with other systems, and it’s worth it the additional security effort for configuring postgres.

I think people also widely misunderstand how it works, which doesn’t help if course. It’s not just a database you can access on the internet, there’s a while bunch of security you set up first, and it uses the native row based security features to separate users’ data.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

It’s pretty interesting to see the different terms on their website.

If you live in the US, you have to sue in California. If you live in Europe (EU + some countries), they suggest two courts (Ireland, the UK), but also state that your local courts will work. They also point you at the EU Online Dispute Resolution platform to get started without a lawyer if you wish to. If you live outside either region, you’re bound to arbitration under the Singapore International Arbitration Centre.

The time limit only seems to apply to the US version of the terms. I’m guessing their lawyers found that they can get away with this shit over there, but probably not everywhere else. Not that unsurprising, I guess; I wouldn’t exactly expect someone living in Morocco or Siberia to go to Singapore to start fighting Bytedance in an arbitration centre, so the entire clause is probably moot anyway.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

Lol, as if Facebook cares about the Fediverse. With its 141 million users, Threads is already ten times bigger than the Fediverse ever was.

ActivityPub isn’t a threat to their business, Bluesky is.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

I don’t get why Mastodon servers feel the need to fully defederate from Threads. Silencing them is much better. It allows your users to follow Threads accounts without people who don’t know anyone on that side getting overwhelmed by the global timeline, as Threads is about twelve times bigger than the entire rest of the Fediverse combined.

Nobody is moving from Threads to Mastodon because mastodon.zip decided to defederate all you’re doing by blocking them is preventing the users with friends who use Threads from using your site correctly.

Of course some platforms, like Lemmy and Kbin, don’t support moderation features like silencing, it makes sense to fully defederate in those cases, but only because of technical restrictions, really.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

At the moment, because it’s almost impossible to get in without knowing someone who’s already in. Currently, after about 10 months, Bluesky has about 2 million users (a sixth of the Fediverse). However, those 12 million Fediverse users have accumulated over seven years. Based on the statistics of fediverse.observer, the majority of those accounts seem to be inactive as well. Mastodon shows growth (about 100k per month) but other parts of the Fediverse are shrinking in activity.

Wikipedia has a graph of Bluesky’s user base growth: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e6/Bluesky_Registered_Users.svg

At its current pace, it’ll take over a year and a half for BS to overtake the Fediverse (in total accounts, four or five months when looking at active users), but I expect those numbers jump up when the platform leaves beta. Wait list + current user base on Bluesky already exceeds the reported “active user” count on Fediverse Observer.

My personal anecdata: all the (semi) corporate entities I used to follow are over at Bluesky right now. Some, annoyingly, use it as their primary platform, while others cross post the same way people did when Mastodon gained mainstream attention. A few of the people/organisations I used to follow on Twitter are on Mastodon (almost exclusively people in the tech sector and a government service here or there) but I haven’t seen any growth whatsoever. Various experiments with Mastodon and other fediverse media also seem to have ended, with people leaving the Fediverse for various reasons (Alec from Technology Connections has done nice write-ups of why the Fediverse kind of sucks if you’re “internet famous” right now, and the reactions from Fediverse evangelists below show why that’s going to stay that way for a while).

I want Bluesky to either commit to federation, or for the Fediverse to take over, but neither seem to stand much of a chance against any corporation with VC money right now. Most of the internet doesn’t seem to be interested in federation and even here on Lemmy many people are confused by it (i.e. “I want to send this person a message but when I go to their profile it says I’m not logged in” because they went to the other user’s home instance instead of their own, an easy mistake to make).

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

Same reason why Telegram friends won’t go to Signal: they don’t care about the platform they use, and you end up being that friend if you ask them to change their habits for you.

Once Threads support federation in both direction, the need to move disappears completely. Why would you move to a server run by volunteers that sometimes goes down when Elon says something stupid, especially if your Mastodon friends can interact with your account like normal. That’s ActivityPub working and doing what it’s supposed to do.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

While Facebook’s recommendation algorithm definitely plays a part here, most of this analysis could have "Facebook " replaced by “the internet” without changing any of the meaning. The same hate speech is also spread across WhatsApp (which caused WhatsApp to put a limit on the amount of times you can forward a message) and every other messenger.

Facebook’s automatic hate speech removal system may be pitifully ineffective, at least they have one. Here on the Fediverse, we have a slur filter, just sometimes, and even fewer moderators per user than Facebook has.

And, despite Facebook’s role in helping spread hate speech as a large platform and refusing to proactively go after such speech, here’s how the rest of your conversation will go:

“Hey, admin, why can’t I follow my mom on threads from your instance?”

“Because Meta facilitated genocide in Myanmar.” “Aw, that’s bad. Anyway, I’ll just create a Threads account I guess, my mom is sharing my niece’s baby pictures.”

skullgiver, (edited )
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

[This comment has been deleted by an automated system]

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

No they didn’t.

Before release CP2077 2.0 and PL please check conditions of your cooling systems in PC. We use all what you have, so workload on CPU 90% on 8 core is expected. To save your time please run Cinebench or similar and check stability of your systems

In other words: CPU load will increase, overclockers with unstable clocks will be more likely so see crashes.

No need to check your cooling, CPUs will be plenty stable unless you messed with your clock speed without significant stability testing.

skullgiver,
@skullgiver@popplesburger.hilciferous.nl avatar

The game will actually use all of the CPU cores without mods now. The lack of SMT support has been fixed, that sounds like optimisation to me. Currently, the game is struggling to use more than half the available CPU power available on some systems.

You can still artificially limit the CPU to only half your cores, of course (by setting the task affinity for the game process)

  • All
  • Subscribed
  • Moderated
  • Favorites
  • fightinggames
  • All magazines