@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

zaphod

@zaphod@lemmy.ca

Just this guy, you know?

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zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

A Short Hike, definitely. I just wish it was longer.

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

I do both, because people can do more than one thing. This is called a false dichotomy, and in this case with an unsubtle whiff of moralizing.

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Nah it’s way simpler than that: turn on Fox. Find out what Trump is saying. Say you’ll do that.

Done and done!

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

You know what?

I’m fine with that hypothetical risk.

“The bad guys will do it anyway so we need to do it, too” is the worst kind of fatalism. That kind of logic can be used to justify any number of heinous acts, and I refuse to live in a world where the worst of us are allowed to drag down the rest of us.

zaphod, (edited )
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Really? I’m supposed to believe AI is somehow more existentially risky than, say, chemical or biological weapons, or human cloning and genetic engineering (all of which are banned or heavily regulated in developed nations)? Please.

I understand the AI hype artists have done a masterful job convincing everyone that their tech is so insanely powerful (and thus incredibly valuable to prospective investors) that it’ll wipe out humanity, but let’s try to be realistic.

But you know, let’s take your premise as a given. Even despite that risk, I refuse to let an unknowable hypothetical be used to hold our better natures hostage. The examples are countless of governments and corporations using vague threats as a way to get us to accept bad deals at the barrel of a virtual gun. Sorry, I will not play along.

zaphod, (edited )
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

You don’t need AI for any of that. Determined state actors have been fabricating information and propagandizing the public, mechanical Turk style, for a long long time now. When you can recruit thousands of people as cheap labour to make shit up online, you don’t need an LLM.

So no, I don’t believe AI represents a new or unique risk at the hands of state actors, and therefore no, I’m not so worried about these technologies landing in the hands of adversaries that I think we should abandon our values or beliefs Just In Case. We’ve had enough of that already, thank you very much.

And that’s ignoring the fact that an adversarial state actor having access to advanced LLMs isn’t somehow negated or offset by us having them, too. There’s no MAD for generative AI.

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Training new models is already the domain of large actors only, simply due to the GPU requirements, which serve as a massive moat. That ship has sailed. There isn’t a single open source model, today, that wasn’t trained by a corporate entity first, and then only fined tuned by the community later.

zaphod, (edited )
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Hah I… think we’re on the same side?

The original comment was justifying unregulated and unmitigated research into AI on the premise that it’s so dangerous that we can’t allow adversaries to have the tech unless we have it too.

My claim is AI is not so existentially risky that holding back its development in our part of the world will somehow put us at risk if an adversarial nation charges ahead.

So no, it’s not harmless, but it’s also not “shit this is basically like nukes” harmful either. It’s just the usual, shitty SV kind of harmful: it will eliminate jobs, increase wealth inequality, destroy the livelihoods of artists, and make the internet a generally worse place to be. And it’s more important for us to mitigate those harms, now, than to worry about some future nation state threat that I don’t believe actually exists.

(It’ll also have lots of positive impact as well, but that’s not what we’re talking about here)

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Not just more stiff, the sharp angles on the body are also much more likely to cause serious injury to pedestrians and cyclists (there’s a reason modern vehicles have rounded edges). Unfortunately the lack of regulations in North America on safety features vis a vis anyone but the vehicle occupants means these death machines remain street legal.

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

The damn maintenance manual tells owners to carefully remove anything remotely corrosive (including, among other things, tree sap). Given Tesla knows the material is subject to rust, I think it’s a bit more than just some confused owners.

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Yes, but you see the difference is my car is expected to rust because it’s not made of supposedly stainless steel.

So I fully expect to have to protect my car’s finish. That’s why it’s painted. The Cybertruck doesn’t even have a clear coat. One would naturally thus expect that, unlike my regular non-stainless steel car, the Cybertruck wouldn’t in fact rust.

Please try to keep your criticisms of Musk fair and unbiased. Otherwise, you risk weakening your point.

Thank you for your unsolicited advice. I’m sure next time I’ll keep it in mind while having meaningless arguments with anonymous internet strangers.

Feds will stop investing in new road infrastructure, environment minister says (www.cbc.ca)

Environment Minister Steven Guilbeault says the federal government will stop investing in new road infrastructure — a comment that immediately drew the ire of the Opposition Conservatives and some premiers who said the climate activist turned politician is out of touch....

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Less waffling and more shitty comms, which unfortunately has been a consistent problem with this government for years, particularly for files where Guilbeault is minister. That guy shouldn’t be allowed anywhere near a microphone…

zaphod,
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Oh sure, on the like paragraph five. That’s way more than a single tweet. How do you expect anyone to read that much all in one go?!?

zaphod,
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Code for, "my children are my property to do with as I see fit. "

Well, unless you decide you want to let them access gender affirming care, in which case you as a parent have no rights at all.

This was never about parental rights. It’s about using the trans community in the same way the right used the gay community in the 70s and 80s: as a moral boogieman they can use to gain power.

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Agreed. The headline is extremely misleading clickbait.

This piece is reporting on what people think they need, not what they actually need (which is highly context dependent), which by itself isn’t very interesting.

The real story is the huge divergence between what people say they need vs what they’re actually targeting, but that’s not news, we’ve known about it for decades (basically every since the defined benefit pension plan ended).

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

And the first paragraph of the article uses the word “believe”, which has a much softer connotation.

The subject line strongly implies that Canadians did the math and “expect” to need $1.7M for retirement.

When you look at the actual article, it’s simply an opinion survey reporting what people said, answers for which could be the result of anything from a rigorous financial plan all the way to a finger in the air guess.

So the headline implies a great deal more certainty in the quoted figures than is actually indicated in the article or supportable by the data.

In short: no, I stand by my claim the article headline is absolutely misleading.

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Bruh, do you really think the author doesn’t know who one of the largest IT agencies in the world is? Could it be, rather, that they were dumbing it down for the audience, since it’s, you know, not an article about Accenture, and ended up with some slightly odd phrasing as a consequence?

3 landlords among largest real estate holders in Ontario owe $144M, under bankruptcy protection: documents (www.cbc.ca)

A small group of landlords who own hundreds of rental properties across the province have run out of money, owe over $144 million in unpaid loans and face dozens of lawsuits from creditors, according to documents filed with the Ontario Superior Court of Justice....

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

It’s all in the framing:

  1. Create a company, making sure that personal assets are insulated from corporate liabilities.
  2. As a corporation, raise funding through equity and debt to support investing in offices, staff, etc, as needed to operate a new venture. Lenders assess the business to determine if it’s a good credit risk, making money if the business succeeds and taking a potential loss if it doesn’t.
  3. Company goes bankrupt.
  4. Company assets are liquidated and disbursed to debt holders (who knew the risks going in) to minimize their losses while owners and employees are insulated from personal liability.

Why? To encourage entrepreneurship: who would want to start a restaurant or coffee shop if they knew they would be personally liable if the business failed?

Is it possible to misuse limited liability corporations for nefarious purposes? Of course. But it’s absurd to imply they don’t serve an important social purpose.

zaphod, (edited )
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

That’s quite literally what bankruptcy proceedings are for.

The point is the value of their assets (i.e. the properties and associated cashflows) exceeds their liabilities (i.e. the loans) and so bankruptcy proceedings are required to figure out how to disburse the value of those assets to the debt holders.

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Yup. Folks seems to be oblivious to the fact that increased interest rates mean savings accounts are pretty decent these days if you shop around. I’m getting 4.5% in a high interest savings account which would’ve unthinkable a few years ago.

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Then FIPPA has to be changed. Right now the act allows for cabinet deliberations to be kept confidential:

ontario.ca/…/chapter-5-exemptions-and-exclusions#…

Maybe that makes sense. Maybe it doesn’t. But that’s the law as written today and the court decided that these letters fall under that carve-out.

zaphod,
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Given MAID wouldn’t be available for a typical case of depression, I’m not sure what your point is other than to ride a hobby horse while diminishing the suffering of people with extreme mental illness.

zaphod, (edited )
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Given those corporations are, you know, renting those units, I’m not sure what your comment has to do with a rental unit supply issue (which is, you know, what this article is about).

zaphod,
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Which also means it’s a density issue. The solution can’t be a sprawl of more single family homes, either.

zaphod,
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Oh yeah it’ll take a generation to undo a generation’s worth of bad zoning and urban planning. But it’s the only real long term solution. No high population urban area on the planet sustains itself with a high level of sprawl (without truly outlandish taxes to pay for the necessary infrastructure – looking at you New Jersey).

Amazon- and Google-backed AI firm Anthropic says “general-purpose AI tools simply could not exist” if AI companies had to pay licences for the training material (www.computerweekly.com)

Generative artificial intelligence (GenAI) company Anthropic has claimed to a US court that using copyrighted content in large language model (LLM) training data counts as “fair use”, however....

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

You do realize that there may in fact be different, distinct groups of Lemmy users with differing, potentially non-overlapping beliefs, yeah?

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Oh, well, you’ve clearly done the kind of deep and thoughtful analysis that would allow you to determine the general opinions of all Lemmy users. My mistake. Carry on.

zaphod, (edited )
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Until one of these AIs just starts selling other people’s work as its own, and no I don’t mean derivative work I mean the copyrighted material, nobody is breaking the rules here.

Except of course that’s not how copyright law works in general.

Of course the questions are 1) is training a model fair use and 2) are the resulting outputs derivative works. That’s for the courts to decide.

But in general, just because I publish content on my website, does not give anyone else license or permission to republish that content or create derivative works, whether for free or for profit, unless I explicitly license that content accordingly.

That’s why things like Creative Commons exists.

But surely you already knew that.

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Obviously any reputable password manager is better than none at all, but I strongly recommend using KeepassXC on the desktop and a suitable mobile client for phones and tablets, and syncing the database across devices with an encrypted peer to peer sync tool like Synching.

I’ve always been nervous about being part of a large, juicy cloud hosted target, and LastPass was the proof that those concerns are well-founded.

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

I can also recommend Keepass2Android, which I’ve been using for years.

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

This is essentially admitting that the cheap money dried up as interest rates returned to normal and now they’re in trouble.

This is basically the story of the last year in tech and while the fed has indicated rates aren’t going to rise further and may start to decline in 2024, we’re unlikely to return to the ultra low rate environment that’s existed for the past 15 years.

I fully expect we’ll hear a lot more stories like this as Silicon Valley companies are forced to actually operate as profitable businesses.

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

If you’re so sure you should run off and short the S&P 500.

zaphod, (edited )
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Because FAANG is the entire economy? Please.

Step out of the SV bubble and you’ll see the economy is fine. The fact that tech was dumb and overextended themselves during and shortly after COVID while relying on ZIRP to fund those expenditures doesn’t mean everyone else did. Stir in changes to tax treatment around R&D that disproportionately impact tech and and no one should be surprised that industry might be getting hit while the rest of the economy ticks on just fine.

zaphod,
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ZIRP - zero interest rate policy. Very common term for anyone following macroeconomic policy since 2008.

Given the group we’re in I hope I don’t have to explain the rest.

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

IMO the right compromise is to return copyright to its original 14 year term. OpenAI can freely train on anything up to 2009 which is still a gigantic amount of material while artists continue to be protected and incentivized.

Teslas Have a Minor Issue Where the Wheels Fly Off While Driving, Documents Show (1ft.io)

Tens of thousands of Tesla owners have had the suspension or steering of their vehicles — even in practically brand new ones — fail in recent years. Newly obtained documents show how Tesla engineers internally called these incidents “flaws” and “failures.”...

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

You mean the front fell off? Damn, Elon should move into ship building…

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Cool, so pick an instance that plans to defederate with them and you’re golden.

Personally, I think all the anti-Threads stuff is paranoid rhetoric and I’d rather see how it pans out. My instance admin agrees so we’ll see how it goes.

Point is you can choose because that’s the entire point of the fediverse. And it’s why I don’t understand why folks are expending so much energy writing paranoid pieces on this topic when they could just defederate and move on.

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

No, that’s literally how this works.

If you don’t like an ActivityPub participant you block it. It’s in the architecture.

And given the current fediverse is already a tiny fraction of total social media activity, if a bunch of anti-Threads instances hive off to form their own fediverse subgroup, it’ll basically be a no-op from their perspective. They’ll just keep talking to each other off in a little corner by themselves just like they’re doing today. That’s kinda the whole damn point of a federated architecture.

zaphod, (edited )
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

I just can’t afford it.

I’m poor and I listen to a lot of things. Buying all that isn’t possible for me.

So basically: you can’t afford the volume of product you want to consume at a price that’s sustainable for artists, but want the product anyway and you see that as some unsolvable dilemma? Have I got that right?

Look, it sucks that you’re in that financial situation. Not here to downplay that struggle. I’ve lived like that and it fuckin sucks.

But maybe the answer is to value the effort of musicians and either pay them for their work or consume less?

zaphod, (edited )
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

So then why post about it?

This isn’t a utilitarian argument. It’s a moral one.

They want to believe there’s some moral dilemma here and they’re, by gosh, trying their best to navigate it.

But the reality is: they want music, but they can’t afford to pay artists in a way that’s sustainable, so they’re just taking it however they can get it and paying a pittance to make themselves feel a bit better.

So quit pretending. They’ve made their choice. Their priorities are clear.

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

By your definition of harm, no artist creating non-material goods (books, movies, music, etc) could ever experience harm due to any one individual’s actions. “I was never going to pay, so taking it without paying is a victim less crime,” etc, etc.

The problem is this is clearly harmful in aggregate.

There are countless actions that, on an individual level are relatively harmless that we deem immoral because they’d be harmful if everyone did them: e.g. polluting.

But setting aside issues of harm–which is absolutely utilitarian–there are also many actions for which no objective “harm” can be identified but which we still deem inherently immoral. For example, if someone cheats on their spouse, and the spouse never finds out, most people I know would say that action is immoral irrespective of the lack of direct harm.

As for your last question, tbh I have no idea.

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Nice work and thanks for posting! You reminded me I needed to diagnose an issue with my handwire and within minutes I’d found and fixed a bad joint…

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Yeah in my build I have a short length of micro USB cable with a usb connector on one end and a 4 pin socket on the other that attaches to a usb breakout board mounted on the edge of the bottom plate. This let me place the usb port in a comfortable location while putting the teensy in a logical place in the case.

Anyway, one of the joints connecting the cable to the 4 pin socket broke. Super easy fix. Other than that it’s been remarkably problem free, and as you say, even if I run into issues into the future, repairs are very easy (unless I ever have to replace the controller… that could be more of a pita).

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Honestly, the multiple profile feature seems like a total afterthought to Google. Even before 14, I experienced endless bugs running a second (work) profile, including the inability to receive incoming phone calls and text messages, odd crashes and freezes, and the launcher hanging fairly regularly.

zaphod,
@zaphod@lemmy.ca avatar

Beat me to it. Here’s the quote in context:

I think we’re on the right path in terms of ensuring we’ve got a work environment and culture that allows people to be productive, to have balance in their lives, and to grow within the company. Everyone has the right to form a union, and certainly in the future, wherever it takes us, we’ll respect that. But we’re very much focused right now on how to create the best work culture and environment we possibly can.

We’re always listening to our workers and we want to make sure we have both formal and informal ways of getting worker feedback and understanding the needs of our employees and where we can improve. And we always act on that feedback. And, as I said earlier, there is always a right to form unions and we respect that.

Well, yeah, congrats, he basically just stated the law: yes, everyone (in the US and many other countries) has the right to form unions. To “respect that” is to acknowledge that right.

I know the bar is damn low for good corporate behaviour, but man, it’s apparently way lower than I realized…

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